Hemp Logs

The world has many different problems for which cannabis hemp provides easy and economically sound solutions. More examples lie at the very heart of today’s biggest dilemma – environmentally safe and sustainable energy at a low cost.

In NUG Magazine’s January article “Hemp Houses: San Diego’s Best Fire Solution” we explored how cannabis hurds mixed with water and lime create fireproof building materials.  This month, we show the energy benefits of using cannabis for fire.  Cannabis, the life giving and versatile plant that is the wise man’s beast of burden, provides a cheap source of locally produced carbon neutral energy when burned.

Cannabis hemp as fuel is undisputed today and as a centuries old source for fire. Throughout human’s use of hemp for food and fiber, a locally valued by-product has been the large amounts of hurd stalks and miscellaneous plant particles called ‘fines’ that remain after processing. Farmers have commonly used these chunks of hurd stalks and fines for fuel. Today, in one of the world’s largest hemp producers, China, many farmers heat their homes and cook with these by-products leftover after extracting the fibers and seeds.

As the cannabis agriculture revolution continues to expand around the world, one of the first and easiest economic avenues for marketing hemp is as a raw material for fueling fires.  Selling cannabis hurd stalks and fines for fuel provides local farmers and producers an immediate additional source of revenue.

Ecologically Friendly Fuel – Hemp Logs – The British Example

In England, a pioneer in industrializing the hemp plant is the company Hemp Technology, which has developed a sustainable and easy-to-use compressed cannabis fire log.

The cannabis fire logs are made from fines processed into 4in x 6in solid cylinders, and cost between $5-$8 for a 10 kilo sack holding 20 logs (approximately 5lb).  The heat generated burning cannabis logs matches or exceeds the heat produced by burning well-seasoned wood.

The hemp used to make the logs is grown sustainably on English farms, with no herbicides or pesticides being used during crop production. One of the biggest benefits of using hemp logs for fire is that the production process is very simple. The cannabis logs are made from hemp fines that are separated during the fiber extraction process and then gathered, dried, and pressed together to form a carbon neutral cylindrical log for energy and fire. No chemicals are needed due to the purely mechanical fiber extraction process, and using the fines for fire logs means truly 100% of the cannabis plant is used, there is no waste.

Burning releases carbon, and the carbon that is released into the atmosphere from burning cannabis is equivalent to the carbon absorbed by the plant during its growth. Consequently, hemp logs are carbon neutral, and unlike trees that take many years to grow, a cannabis crop grows to maturity in 90 days.  Further emphasizing the superiority of cannabis, burned hemp produces cannabis ash which contains soil-improving nutrients that can be spread in your garden.

Local Cannabis Cultivation Provides Low Cost Energy and Economic Growth

The British production of energy from hemp fire logs is a good example to the industrialized and non-industrialized world of the instant return available from using cannabis agriculturally on a massive but local scale.  Hemp Technology, with its $6 million dollar hemp processing facility, employs 35 people and processes 50,000 tons of hemp straw a year.  It has taken the least appreciated part of the cannabis plant, the ‘floor litter’ fines, and turned them into logs, jobs, and money.

Since the cannabis fines are next to free, the biggest downside of using hemp for fire is transporting the product, because, other than producing the logs, the only cost is getting the logs to you, the consumer. Hence, the closer the cannabis is grown to the consumer the cheaper the costs get for everyone, the cannabis company, the consumer, and the environment. One of the first lessons in the new cannabis agro-economy is that growing, processing, and use WILL BE LOCAL.

If California farmers were allowed to grow cannabis on an industrial scale again, then we all would have a cheap economic and environmental source for our fires. Imagine bringing your 10 kilo sack of locally grown cannabis logs down to the beach to kick it, knowing your enjoyment of the fire is feeding into the global solution, not feeding off age-old trees.

The world has many different problems for which cannabis hemp provides easy and economically sound solutions. More examples lie at the very heart of today’s biggest dilemma – environmentally safe and sustainable energy at a low cost.

In NUG Magazine’s January article “Hemp Houses: San Diego’s Best Fire Solution” we explored how cannabis hurds mixed with water and lime create fireproof building materials.  This month, we show the energy benefits of using cannabis for fire.  Cannabis, the life giving and versatile plant that is the wise man’s beast of burden, provides a cheap source of locally produced carbon neutral energy when burned.

Cannabis hemp as fuel is undisputed today and as a centuries old source for fire. Throughout human’s use of hemp for food and fiber, a locally valued by-product has been the large amounts of hurd stalks and miscellaneous plant particles called ‘fines’ that remain after processing. Farmers have commonly used these chunks of hurd stalks and fines for fuel. Today, in one of the world’s largest hemp producers, China, many farmers heat their homes and cook with these by-products leftover after extracting the fibers and seeds.

As the cannabis agriculture revolution continues to expand around the world, one of the first and easiest economic avenues for marketing hemp is as a raw material for fueling fires.  Selling cannabis hurd stalks and fines for fuel provides local farmers and producers an immediate additional source of revenue.  Ecologically Friendly Fuel – Hemp Logs – The British Example

In England, a pioneer in industrializing the hemp plant is the company Hemp Technology, which has developed a sustainable and easy-to-use compressed cannabis fire log.

The cannabis fire logs are made from fines processed into 4in x 6in solid cylinders, and cost between $5-$8 for a 10 kilo sack holding 20 logs (approximately 5lb).  The heat generated burning cannabis logs matches or exceeds the heat produced by burning well-seasoned wood.
The hemp used to make the logs is grown sustainably on English farms, with no herbicides or pesticides being used during crop production. One of the biggest benefits of using hemp logs for fire is that the production process is very simple. The cannabis logs are made from hemp fines that are separated during the fiber extraction process and then gathered, dried, and pressed together to form a carbon neutral cylindrical log for energy and fire. No chemicals are needed due to the purely mechanical fiber extraction process, and using the fines for fire logs means truly 100% of the cannabis plant is used, there is no waste.

Burning releases carbon, and the carbon that is released into the atmosphere from burning cannabis is equivalent to the carbon absorbed by the plant during its growth. Consequently, hemp logs are carbon neutral, and unlike trees that take many years to grow, a cannabis crop grows to maturity in 90 days.  Further emphasizing the superiority of cannabis, burned hemp produces cannabis ash which contains soil-improving nutrients that can be spread in your garden.

Local Cannabis Cultivation Provides Low Cost Energy and Economic Growth

The British production of energy from hemp fire logs is a good example to the industrialized and non-industrialized world of the instant return available from using cannabis agriculturally on a massive but local scale.  Hemp Technology, with its $6 million dollar hemp processing facility, employs 35 people and processes 50,000 tons of hemp straw a year.  It has taken the least appreciated part of the cannabis plant, the ‘floor litter’ fines, and turned them into logs, jobs, and money.

Since the cannabis fines are next to free, the biggest downside of using hemp for fire is transporting the product, because, other than producing the logs, the only cost is getting the logs to you, the consumer. Hence, the closer the cannabis is grown to the consumer the cheaper the costs get for everyone, the cannabis company, the consumer, and the environment. One of the first lessons in the new cannabis agro-economy is that growing, processing, and use WILL BE LOCAL.

If California farmers were allowed to grow cannabis on an industrial scale again, then we all would have a cheap economic and environmental source for our fires. Imagine bringing your 10 kilo sack of locally grown cannabis logs down to the beach to kick it, knowing your enjoyment of the fire is feeding into the global solution, not feeding off age-old trees.

Steve

Author: Steve

Built Like That!

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Gaston Beddoe
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Thank you for the info. It sounds pretty user friendly. I guess I’ll pick one up for fun. thank u

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