Puresel

By Tiffany Janay

Africa is known for many of its natural resources, such as gold and diamonds, but there is so much more to the land; the plant life is as rich as its minerals. Puresel is a new company determined to provide high quality plant life to people who can’t so easily travel around the world to get it themselves.

I spoke with Marleen, one of the partners in the company, and she shared with me some of her favorite treasures from Africa. If a trip across the globe isn’t in your near future, no worries, you can pick it up from www.Puresel.com

On their website you can find common products such as Kratom and Kava Kava, but they also offer new competitive products that most other companies don’t have. The reason is because they are working directly with the farmers and have good relationships with their growers who provide them with insight into which plants and which parts of plants, in general, are most effective and beneficial. They like to know where it came from and where it’s going on its way to packaging. They have also done extensive amounts of traveling because it’s very important to do site visits and meet face-to-face with people to be sure of where their supplies are coming from.

The company just launched in November and the product line will be expanding over time as they continue to do more research and become inspired by plants. Marleen says she was drawn to this business because she feels that there is a lot of information to learn from other cultures, and she is fascinated by the anthropology of it all.  It has been a long process to get to the point where it’s a business and not just a hobby.

Depending on what your experience level is, you will be able to find a variety of forms in which to purchase the plant and it will determine its potency to help you have the best experience possible.

Throughout the world, there are many cultures using plants to help with different types of ailments, and they have been using them for thousands of years. Due to research, it is now accessible to us in our modern world.

One plant that has really impressed her is from South Africa – Sceletium Tortuosum. It’s very wildly used by indigenous and mainstream people over there; yet, it is a mystery to many people in this country. It’s a succulent and has been in recorded use since the 1600s. Back then, shepherds would use it while going on long treks to take their animals to pasture. They would chew on it because it was an appetite suppressant and could stop thirst, and it was also useful as an anti-depressant and a relaxer.  In modern day, there have been clinical studies that have shown it as effective as pharmaceutical anti-depressants. In South Africa, veterinarians are using it in liquid form to mist the face of an animal and completely relax it within minutes.

A seed the size of a golf ball called Entada Rheedii, also from Africa, has been used traditionally for inducing dreams, which is why it is also known as The African Dream herb. The seeds are typically found washed up on beaches in East and South Africa. Many people seem to be interested in having lucid dreams and increasing awareness and memory of dreams, and this has been used to encourage that exploration.

Blue Lotus is a water lily that comes from Northern Africa and parts of Asia. There is research that shows it can help with Alzheimer’s and migraine headaches. Careful though, because there are reports that show it has a Viagra effect as well. It is said to cause euphoric feelings and relieve pain. It is, overall, known as a blood flowing stimulant. You can make a tea out of it, smoke it, or soak it in a high-grade alcohol for a few days. Depending on how you use it will determine the effect. She recommends letting it soak for about 20-30 minutes to make a tea, and then give it a try.

My concern with using sacred plant life from other countries is taking away from their land to meet the mass demand. How do the indigenous people feel about the extraction of the precious pieces of their land?

Puresel says that they try to do things as sustainable as possible and are looking to connect with people who are already farming and selling the plants. They find someone who is interested in working with them and are already doing it to support their culture. For example, with kava kava, Marleen feels there is more supply than there is demand, so she believes they are supporting the culture by purchasing it from them and paying the fairest prices they can. They are not looking to take advantage of anybody.

Take your journey down the natural path a bit further and give some other plant life a try.

Steve

Author: Steve

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